The Complete Guide To The 7 Chakras – For Beginners

The entire universe is made of energy, and your body is no exception. Long before modern technology and science, ancient cultures knew that all living things carried a life force with them. They called the centers of energy that move inside of us, the 7 chakras. So what are the seven chakras?

Chakra is an old Sanskrit word that literally translates to wheel. This is because the life force, or prana, that moves inside of you is spinning and rotating. This spinning energy has 7 centers in your body, starting at the base of your spine and moving all the way up to the top of your head.

In a healthy, balanced person, the 7 chakras provide exactly the right amount of energy to every part of your body, mind and spirit. However, if one of your chakras is too open and spinning too quickly, or if it is too closed and moving slowly, your health will suffer. By learning about the 7 chakras, you can become more in tune with the natural energy cycles of your body. You can use this information to connect physical, emotional and spiritual imbalances with the chakras that empower them. Of course, with those discoveries you can begin to balance your chakras and live a healthy and harmonious life.


The 7 Chakras for Beginners

Before diving right into learning about the seven chakras and what each of them do, take a moment now to tune in to your body and see if you can feel your chakras at work. For beginners, those chakra exercises may seem “odd” – simply go with the flow and soon, you will not be a chakra beginner any longer Think of this exercise like an introduction; you’re tuning in for, perhaps, the very first time.

  • First, start by making sure you’re in a quiet space. If you can’t be right now, just return to this section of the article later. But if you can, sit quietly for a moment and take a few deep breaths. Let tension and stress slide away for just a moment. Just be in the moment, with your body.

  • Now, bring your attention to the base of your spine, your tailbone, and imagine a bright spinning red light. Feel it pulsing and rotating with your breath. Sit with that for a moment.

  • Move your attention up your spine to the area a couple of inches below your belly button. Feel the warmth of a bright, orange spinning light. Again, notice how it moves with your breath.

  • Guide your attention further up to a couple inches above your belly button. You’re probably familiar with this area, because when you feel strong emotions like love or fear, you likely feel it here. Notice how you can sense the intense yellow light rotating in that spot.

  • Bring your attention further up to the center of your chest where your heart is. This area harnesses a bright green light. When you’re touched or moved, you might instinctively place your hand over this spot. Connect with that area now.

  • Then, bring your attention to your throat, the dip in between your collar bones. Imagine a bright blue light spinning in that area. You may feel the urge to swallow or clear your throat as you think of it.

  • Next, move your attention up to the space on your forehead between your eyebrows, your third eye. This area holds a deep indigo rotating light. Imagine yourself becoming wiser as it spins and becomes brighter.

  • Finally, shift your attention to the very top of your head. Imagine a vibrant, spinning violet light that shines right out of the top of your body. This light connects you to the universe. Feel the peace that comes with noticing this light.


1. Root Chakra — Represents our foundation and feeling of being grounded.

  • Location: Base of spine in tailbone area.

  • Emotional issues: Survival issues such as financial independence, money and food.


2. Sacral Chakra — Our connection and ability to accept others and new experiences.

  • Location: Lower abdomen, about two inches below the navel and two inches in.

  • Emotional issues: Sense of abundance, well-being, pleasure and sexuality.


3. Solar Plexus Chakra — Our ability to be confident and in control of our lives.

  • Location: Upper abdomen in the stomach area.

  • Emotional issues: Self-worth, self-confidence and self-esteem.


4. Heart Chakra — Our ability to love.

  • Location: Center of chest just above the heart.

  • Emotional issues: Love, joy and inner peace.


5. Throat Chakra — Our ability to communicate.

  • Location: Throat.

  • Emotional issues: Communication, self-expression of feelings and the truth.


6. Third Eye Chakra — Our ability to focus on and see the big picture.

  • Location: Forehead between the eyes (also called the Brow Chakra).

  • Emotional issues: Intuition, imagination, wisdom and the ability to think and make decisions.


7. Crown Chakra — The highest chakra represents our ability to be fully connected spiritually.

  • Location: The very top of the head.

  • Emotional issues: Inner and outer beauty, our connection to spirituality and pure bliss.

What Does Namaste Even Mean, Anyway?

If you've ever attended a yoga class, you know that every practice ends with the instructor putting their hands together in prayer position in front of their chest or their third eye (between your two eyes) and saying Namaste. These days, you'll see Namaste pop up on workout tanks and internet memes like "Namaste in bed," but the original Sanskrit term holds much deeper meaning.

What does Namaste mean?

In English, Namaste translates to "I bow to you" or "The divine in me honors the divine in you." But it's not meant to have a religious sentiment as it sounds. The meaning of Namaste is a mantra of peace and equality to live by on and off the mat. Here, some yoga instructors share what Namaste means to their practice and how they impart its positive message to their students.

What does Namaste mean in yoga?

It’s a greeting for your soul

In India or other areas where Sanskrit is spoken, Namaste is a greeting in everyday life to simply address someone, but in yoga, it's a more profound gesture of respect toward another person. Francesca de Luca, a certified yoga teacher in Rome, Italy, says that when you say Namaste, you connect to your divine soul. "From that 'sacred space,' you bow to the divine in the person in front of you," she says.

“When we talk about the divine, we aren't referring to something religious, but to the most pure or elevated part of ourselves—to our inner light, to our spirit,” de Luca explains.

Crystal McCreary, a certified yoga instructor in New York City, says that saying Namaste can be another way to bring more authenticity to yoga and help people feel more welcome in class and in the community. “Namaste can often be misused as a greeting, particularly if the practitioner who is actually saying it perpetuates a harmful, culturally appropriative yogic environment that does not honor where yoga comes from,” McCreary says.

It connects people to the yoga community

Every yoga class ends in Savasana, aka corpse pose, but Namaste is the true closer. For many instructors, Namaste allows them to connect to all of their students, whether they're beginners or advanced, and offer a gesture of deep understanding toward them. “For me in a yoga class, embracing the practice of Namaste is about doing my best to take my yoga students in when I greet, teach, and say goodbye to them. I try to fully see them,” McCreary says.

McCreary says that Namaste is a way to strengthen an instructor's relationship with their students and make them feel like they're a part of the practice. “A feeling of being included, an experience of their needs being considered and valued, as if their experience and their humanity is respected, and that the studio staff is committed to offering them a nourishing experience of yoga,” she adds. Namaste—when used genuinely—serves as a way to acknowledge that each student is just as valued in the practice as the instructor.

It establishes equality among everyone in the practice

When an instructor says Namaste at the end of class, students usually repeat it back. Morgan Perry, certified yoga instructor and founder of Yoga Unwined, says that during class, the teacher is the leader in the room. But when students echo Namaste back to the instructor at the end of class, it puts everyone on the same level.

"Offering more intimate greetings are clues to finding deeper, more sacred human connectedness because truly seeing someone has the capacity to bring forth a richer shared connection,” McCreary says.

A main principle of Namaste is to create an atmosphere of equality regardless of the type of yoga, whether it’s a solo practice or a huge group doing a Bikram yoga session. Jeremy Robinson, a certified Acro yoga instructor, holistic health coach, and owner of Austin Holistic Fitness, believes in the importance of using Namaste to cultivate a relationship of trust and friendship among yoga partners.

"Saying Namaste at the end of an Acro yoga practice is the equivalent of saying 'I support you and thank you for supporting me,'” Robinson says. Robinson also says it adds a strong sense of self-respect, which is an essential part of building a trusting relationship in Acro yoga or any type of yoga. “Take care of yourself emotionally, physically, and spiritually, and bring that self-love into a friendship and partnership in Acro,” he says.

How to live Namaste principles outside of class

It allows yogis to open up to each other

Because Namaste is a greeting that connects people, it can also be an invitation to begin socializing after class has ended. In certain settings, it can be the perfect jumping off point for great conversation.

“Yoga Unwined adds a social component to yoga, so if you think of Namaste as a greeting or acknowledgment of others, this is something that happens in our classes organically between students," Perry says. "In our classes, the last half hour is very social. The wine tasting is interactive and then students get to chat with each other after class," Perry adds. When you keep in mind the true meaning of Namaste, you acknowledge that you have this yoga practice in common with other people, so it ultimately helps you open yourself up to others.

It helps you respect others

Recognizing the “divine” in others is the first step toward bringing Namaste into practice outside the mat. “When we relate to other people, we shouldn't judge them from their appearance or their position within society. We should always try to see the good in them, their light, their beautiful soul,” de Luca stresses. This idea also involves being open to others’ views and perspectives, no matter where they’re coming from. McCreary makes a point to greet each of her students as a way to makes them feel safe and at ease immediately. “Part of doing that means that I greet them with a smile and joy, and in a way that implies both ‘I see you’ and ‘I love you,’” she says.

Implementing more Namaste into your everyday life starts with simple gestures. “Everyone can start with very small things, like listening more from the heart when someone talks to us. Connect to their soul beyond the words they use or pause for a moment instead of reacting quickly to bad situations. Just to have the time to breathe,” McCreary says. Namaste is all about enriching any environment with compassion. “Every classroom community, but a yoga classroom in particular, should be a place where—at the minimum—we aim to practice greeting, seeing, and listening to the fullness of one another’s humanity, whether we say Namaste or not.”

Study Finds Disinfectant Cleaners May Alter Children’s Gut Microbiome

The right balance of good and bad bacteria in our gut affects our ability to extract nutrients from our food, supports our immune system function and affects mental health. Yet it seems the microbiome of children is potentially compromised by common household products, such as disinfectant cleaners.

The Study of Children’s Microbiome

A new Canadian study analyzed the microbiome of 757 babies. Using the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development birth cohort, the scientists studied the microbes in these children’s fecal matter.

The researchers initially assessed infants at age of 3-4 months. Then, they checked the weight of these your subjects at ages 1 and 3 years. In addition, the researchers used the World Health Organization growth charts to compare the participants’ body mass index to peers their age.

Furthermore, the scientists assessed how often common household products were used in the home of these children. The study included products such as detergents, disinfectant cleaners, and eco-friendly products.

Household Disinfectant Cleaners Impact Home Environment

The findings of the study confirmed that using household disinfectants affects much more than germs living on household surfaces. Researchers discovered that babies 3-4 months old who lived in homes where disinfectants were frequently used had the biggest associations with altered gut flora. The same trend was found in homes that cleaned with disinfectants more frequently.

Incredible evidence that will change how you think about cancer

Those infants growing up in households with heavy use of eco cleaners had much lower levels of the gut microbes Enterobacteriaceae. However, we found no evidence that these gut microbiome changes caused the reduced obesity risk.

Of course, it is possible that homes that use eco-friendly products are more conscious in general about living healthy. One must consider that the general health of the parents and the family’s food choices may have also contributed to some of the subjects’ healthier weight.

Conclusion

Clearly, the study brings up a very important point: whatever chemicals you use within your home could end up in your gut. Using antibacterial cleaning products, as well as personal care products such as antibacterial soap, may help keep your home germ-free…but are you willing to risk your family’s long-term health?

Epidemiologists Dr. Noel Mueller and Moira Differding of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health share their findings from another study:

There is biologic plausibility to the finding that early-life exposure to disinfectants may increase risk of childhood obesity through the alterations in bacteria within the Lachnospiraceae family.

Let’s be realistic. It will likely take many more studies for the word to spread about the dangers of the overuse of disinfectant cleaners. As such, it is up to you to make an educated decision that is best for your family and your health.

There are many perfectly safe and effective ways to clean your home naturally. Click here for some simple ideas on how to make your own DIY household cleaners. As well, there are plenty of eco-friendly brands offering a variety of safe home cleaning products.

This article (Study Finds Disinfectant Cleaners May Alter Children’s Gut Microbiome) was originally created and published by Waking Times and is published here under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Anna Hunt and WakingTimes.com. It may be re-posted freely with proper attribution, author bio, and this copyright statement.